Release your Inner Calm

Are you feeling the pressures of everyday life in the fast lane? There are plenty of ways to help yourself find the calm among the storm.

Lets look to one of the easiest things to use… YOUR BREATH!!
Controlled breathing is a great technique that can be used to help lower blood pressure, promote feelings of calmness and relaxation, helps anxiety and to de-stress.

Here are some different breathing techniques:

1. Equal Breathing
To start, Inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four – all through your nose.
This is a great technique if your trying to get to sleep.

breathing

 

 

2. Abdominal Breathing
Hold one hand on your chest and the other on your belly. Take a deep breath through the nose ensuring the diaphragm inflates. Count six to10 deep slow breathes per minute for 10 minutes.

3. Progressive Relaxation

To get rid of tension head to toe, close the eyes and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two or three seconds each. All while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

4. Guided Meditation and Visualisation

Go straight to your happy place using a guided recording from either a coach, teacher or podcast to enter total relaxation through visualisation.

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5. Skull Shining Breathe

Begin with a long, slow inhale followed by a quick powerful exhale generated from the lower belly. Do 10 of these every one to two seconds.

Trying these techniques can help get you to a nice and relaxing place amongst all the rush in normal life. To practice and use this at least once a day for a few minutes can help greatly in your everyday stressors.

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An Apple a Day

Putting the Apple-a-day Adage To the Test

By Robert H. Shmerling, M.D Harvard Health Publications and submitted by Krystyna A.

Okay, so maybe you’ve heard this one before: An apple a day keeps the doctor away. I wouldn’t have considered this a myth because everyone knows its not true, right?

Well not so fast. A number of studies have actually put this adage to the test, at least indirectly.

A look at the evidence: Consider the following studies published over the years:

  • In 2007, researchers from Pennsylvania state University found that study subjects who ate an apple before lunch – about 125 calories – consumed 187 fewer calories overall than subjects who didn’t eat an apple at all. Apple juice and apple sauce on the other hand, had no such effect. The researchers suggested that the work of eating the apple or the time it took to eat it somehow made study subjects think they’d eaten more than they had.
  • Researchers from Cornell University published a study in 2004 in the journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showing that the flavonoid, quercetin (found primarily in apples, berries and onions) protected the nerve tissue of rats from hydrogen peroxide, a standard oxidative stressor in laboratory preparations. Based on these findings, they theorized that apple consumption might reduce the risk of brain-damaging illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
  • In a 2007 study, researchers in the United Kingdom found that people who ate five apples a week had better lung function and a lower risk of asthma than people who did not eat apples. A prior study suggested the same thing and also linked the beneficial effects of apples to their high concentration of quercetin. Two additional studies have linked apple intake with a lower risk of lung cancer.
  • A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition linked the high intake of flavonoids (a plant based nutrient) with lower death rates from cardiovascular disease among postmenopausal women. Of course, apples weren’t the only source of flavonoids associated with dodging cardiovascular death. Bran, pears, wine, grapefruit, strawberries and chocolate are high-flavonoid foods whose intakes were associated with lower cardiovascular disease and/or death rates in this study.

So should we get aboard the apple bandwagon?

Considering the findings of these studies, is it time to make apples a bigger part of our diet? Sure, if you like apples. But I don’t think we have enough hard evidence to completely buy into the “apple cure” just yet. Some of this research is based on animals, which we know does not always apply directly to humans. And it’s notoriously difficult to perform studies of dietary intake and link them to specific health outcomes when there are so many variables to consider. For example, when compared with people who don’t like apples, maybe apples-eaters have other healthy behaviours, such as exercise, that lower their risk of heart or lung disease.

The Bottom Line:

Apples may be even better for you than previously appreciated. They are a healthy food choice, especially if eaten instead of less nutritious snacks. But even if apples can’t keep the doctor away , eating more apples are unlikely to cause you harm.  Regardless of how you feel about apples, this is a good example of how some “myths” are just waiting to be transformed into fact. Good research and an open mind is all that lies between the apple-a-day myth and “the next big thing” in healthy diets.

Apple Facts:

  • Adding apples to the diet is a healthy option that increases weight loss. Just three apples a day (one before each meal) not only helped women lose weight but improved their overall health profile.
  • Make sure you always include the skin of apples- in 2007 researchers discovered a dozen compounds in apple peel that inhibit or kill cancer cells in the laboratory, which may help explain the anti-cancer activity of whole apples.
  • Red Delicious apple has almost four times the antioxidant content of brewed tea.
  • After harvest, apples continue to be a living entity and maintain the vital processes of each living cell, with some studies actually showing an increase in antioxidant activity and phytochemical levels after storage.
  • In addition to being antioxidant rich, apples are rich in nutrients such as fibre, potassium, Vitamin C, B vitamins and have a low GI.

 

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Finally its come into mainstream News

The Daily Telegraph has just recently written this article explaining that doctors are now being urged to advise against using paracetemol for mild fevers. We have been saying this for years, so we would love to share the fact that mainstream media has finally come out and said what we already knew.. Have Read below:

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Parents warned against giving paracetamol and ibuprofen for mild fever

Parents should not give children with a mild fever regular spoonfuls of paracetamol and ibuprofen, doctors advise today, as they warn that doing so could extend their illness or put their health at risk

A misplaced “fever phobia” in society means parents too frequently use both medicines to bring down even slight temperatures, say a group of American paediatricians, who warn that children can receive accidental overdoses as a result.

As many as half of parents are giving their children the wrong dosage, according to a study carried out by the doctors.

In new guidance, the American Academy of Pediatrics advises that a high temperature is often the body’s way of fighting an infection, and warns parents that to bring it down with drugs could actually lengthen a child’s illness.

Family doctors too readily advise parents to use the medicines, known collectively as “antipyretics”, according to the authors of the guidance.

GPs also often tell parents to give their children alternate doses of paracetamol and ibuprofen – known as combination therapy – believing the risk of side effects to be minimal.

In its official guidance, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) says the use of the drugs “should be considered in children with fever who appear distressed or unwell”.

“It should be emphasised that fever is not an illness but is, in fact, a physiological mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection”

Although Nice says that both drugs should not “routinely” be given to children with a fever, it states that this approach “may be considered” if the child does not respond to being given just one of them.

Children’s paracetamol solutions such as Calpol and ibuprofen solutions such as Nurofen for Children are sold over the counter in chemists. Recommended dosage quantities vary by age.

There is a range of solutions for different age groups, meaning it is possible for parents with children of different ages to mix up which they are giving.

According to the British National Formulary, which GPs consult when prescribing or advising on medication, children should receive no more than four doses of the right amount of paracetamol in a 24-hour period, and no more than four doses of ibuprofen a day.

Painkiller rip-off: Pills for migraine, period pain, backache ‘are identical’

In its guidance today, however, the American Academy of Pediatrics notes that both medications have potential side effects and says the risks should be taken seriously.

Doctors, the authors write, should begin “by helping parents understand that fever, in and of itself, is not known to endanger a generally healthy child”. “It should be emphasised that fever is not an illness but is, in fact, a physiological mechanism that has beneficial effects in fighting infection.”

Despite this, the academy says, many parents administer paracetamol or ibuprofen even though there is only a minimal fever, or none at all.

“Unfortunately, as many as half of all parents administer incorrect doses,” the authors say. A frequent error is giving children adult-sized doses, while children who are small for their age can also receive doses that are too high even if their parents follow the instructions correctly.

Paracetamol has been linked to asthma, while there have been reports of ibuprofen causing stomach ulcers and bleeding, and leading to kidney problems.

“Questions remain regarding the safety” of combination therapy, say the authors, led by Dr Janice Sullivan, of the University of Louisville Pediatric Pharmacology Research Unit, and Dr Henry Farrar, of the University of Arkansas.

Dr Clare Gerada, the chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said: “In my experience of 20 years as a GP, parents are usually pretty careful.

“I think the most important thing to be worried about is keeping medicines out of the reach of children, because some taste quite nice.”

This was published by The Daily Telegraph last week.

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Is your Spine ready for Summer?

Is your spine ready for summer?

With summer upon us it is important to remember that as we shake off the winter dust and start to do more outdoor activities and get back into different sports and fun activities, it is important to prepare our bodies and spines before just jumping in head first and going for gold. There are important supporting muscles and ligaments around the spine that if we prepare them first before major activity or loading we can decrease the chance of injury and make sure you stay strong. If these stabilizers are being lazy this can cause the spine to become misaligned (known as subluxation) and this can then cause the body to get pain and stiffness in certain areas, seize up, repair much slower and decay faster. To prevent this from happening there are a couple of things you can do to strengthen these stabilizers. As with any exercises you should always consult a professional before proceeding and if you have any discomfort you should stop immediately and speak to your chiropractor.

There are three specific exercises I would recommend for getting these stabilizers strong:

1. Superman: With this exercise lie on your stomach with your forehead supported by a towel

to relieve and pressure on the neck. Slowly raise your right arm and left leg at the same time off the groundsuperman and hold for three deep breaths. Then lower them down and repeat with the left arm and the right leg.

It’s not about how high you lift the limbs it’s about keeping your whole body still and level as you raise them. Pretend you have a glass of water sitting on your lower back and you don’t want to let any of the water spill. Repeat
5 times.

2. Posterior bridge: Lying on your back, bend your knees, keepithe-bridge-exerciseng your feet on the floor. In that position tighten your buttocks. Slowly raise your buttocks off the floor and keep the pelvis level so there is no rotation left

or right. Hold for 3 deep breaths then slowly lower the buttocks back to the floor. Repeat 5 times.

 

 

3. Side bridge. Start on your side and come up onto your elbow so it is on the floor directly below your shoulder. Bend your knees but keep your body in a straight line. Slowly raise your hips off the floor so you are lifting your body up and resting side_plank2your weight between your arm and your knees.

Hold for 10-15 seconds. Build that up to 1 minute. When you get comfortable with that straighten your legs and come up onto your feet rather than your knees and build up to 1 minute in that position. Do this exercise on both sides.

If you have concerns about the stability of your spine or would like more information about these exercises and how you can get a stronger spine to be doing the things that you love, Say Hello at adminlc@chiropracticcentral.com.au or (02) 9418 9031

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Is your spine in line Lane Cove?

This week and next Chiropractic Central will be holding complimentary spine and posture screenings in Lane Cove!

Is your spine in line

Tuesday 13th October: Form 5.30pm to 7pm, come down to Soulful Fitness for a spine and posture screening.

Monday 19th October: From 7.30pm – 8pm, Chiropractic Central will be at Vision Personal Training Lane Cove. Take advantage of our expertise and learn more about your spine.

regards,

Dr Sarah MacNeil

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